Library Dissertation Showcase

A Comparative Analysis of the Impact of Student-Based Events on Students’ Feelings of Social Anxiety and / or Loneliness Whilst at University

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2020

The overarching aim of this research study was to determine if, and the extent to which, student-based events impact students’ feelings of loneliness and / or social anxiety whilst at university, and how this impact differs between nightlife and non-nightlife-based student events. Having conducted a thorough and in-depth literature review, the author determined students’ who have a strong support network and sense of belonging in a university’s wider community from the beginning of their academic life are not only more likely to thrive academically and stay throughout the duration of their course, but are also much less likely to suffer with prolonged feelings of loneliness and / or social anxiety whilst at university. Having discovered this, the author then proceeded to conduct and analyse 12 semi-structured interviews with current UK university students to determine the if, and the extent to which student-based events impacted their feelings of loneliness and / or social anxiety whilst at University. The findings gathered clearly showed that both nightlife and non-nightlife-based student events had a major impact on reducing students’ feelings of loneliness and / or social anxiety whilst at university, as they not only facilitated students establishing their important support networks whilst at university but also helped students to maintain them throughout their academic life. Given the newly discovered importance of nightlife and non-nightlife based student events on reducing students’ feelings of loneliness and / or social anxiety whilst at University, this report recommends that UK Universities not only increase and expand their current event offerings but also improve their event variety so that all students’ needs, regardless of their preference, are catered for.

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